We don’t currently produce a newsletter, but here are examples of those produced previously.

Past issues of Havant Spiritualists:

August 2012

April 2012

March 2012

February 2012

Autumn 2011

Summer_2011

Spring_2011

Winter_2010

Autumn 2010


An excerpt from the philosophy article in our Winter 2010 edition:

Officially we don’t celebrate Christmas, it is for Christians. But then most of those who do celebrate it only do so as an excuse for non-Christian excesses of food, drink and partying—good old fashioned Pagan Bacchanalia .

But there is no reason we can’t join in and enjoy the principles of love and peace on earth. Surely all religions must support that? But it is hard to ignore the commercialisation and greed that is the epitome of a modern Christmas.

The principle of the Christmas season can be part of our mid-winter holiday; the ancient ways of gift-giving, tree decorating and bringing family and society together during a time when there was little to do during the short winter days and long cold nights, except look forward to better times in the spring, when life re-emerges. Embellish it all with twinkly lights, snow and Santa Claus, and there you have it, Christmas.

So as Spiritualists we, too, can feel the joy of Brotherhood, we can take time for our neighbours, friends and families—our society, the animals, wild and domesticated, our environment and our planet.


An article from our Spring 2010 edition:

What good will praying do you?

Followers of all religions pray, some to their god or gods, others to their ancestors or earth elements. But why?

The Christians are typical of those who pray to a god. Their prayers are usually asking their God to give or provide something. Their God is omnipresent, omnipowerful, He is everywhere, He can do anything, so their prayers may be for protection, guidance, for Him to keep others safe, or to make those who are ill well again.

Others pray to pile praise on their deity, perhaps they work on the principle that it builds ‘bonus points’ for later.

Sometimes a prayer is a sending out of energy, a wish, to the world or the universe. Not for an unseen god to work his magic or wield his power, but in the hope that our thoughts and will are strong enough to have a positive effect on a situation that we cannot change because we lack physical strength or practical skills.

As Spiritualists we can use prayer to communicate with those who have passed. If we use it as a meditation we may even hear a reply, or get a feeling of calm or knowing or of inner strength.

Buddhists have prayer wheels. The wheel is engraved with a prayer and every time the wheel is spun or turned the prayer is cast out to the world to do its good.

With all this praying going on around the world, where are the results?

Is praying worth the effort?


Here is an article from our winter edition.

In each issue we have discussed one of the Seven Principles of Spiritualism. This time we will look at the complete package. They say that the whole is more than the sum of the individual parts; Spiritualism is more than just seven principles.

It is more than a religion, it is a way of life, but then surely that is what a religion should be. Not something you wear on a Sunday to impress your friends, or purge your soul from the previous week’s sins, but each and every day, all day, you should think and act in ways that will take you farther along your eternal journey towards perfection.

The trouble is, we never quite make it, do we? Sometimes it is that action or word that is less than spiritual, a sharp comment about someone, or a grey thought casts a shadow over our view of the world. But all that is because we are human, or rather spirit in human form, and we are here because we have work to do. We have things to learn, and things to teach each other. We continue our spiral journey through space and time until we can move to higher realms. And when we have perfected our Spiritualist Principles we will move on, towards the Light. Well that’s the plan.

How do you get through your day as a Spiritualist?

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What good will praying do you?

Followers of all religions pray, some to their god or gods, others to their ancestors or earth elements. But why?

The Christians are typical of those who pray to a god. Their prayers are usually asking their God to give or provide something. Their God is omnipresent, omnipowerful, He is everywhere, He can do anything, so their prayers may be for protection, guidance, for Him to keep others safe, or to make those who are ill well again.

Others pray to pile praise on their deity, perhaps they work on the principle that it builds ‘bonus points’ for later.

Sometimes a prayer is a sending out of energy, a wish, to the world or the universe. Not for an unseen god to work his magic or wield his power, but in the hope that our thoughts and will are strong enough to have a positive effect on a situation that we cannot change because we lack physical strength or practical skills.

As Spiritualists we can use prayer to communicate with those who have passed. If we use it as a meditation we may even hear a reply, or get a feeling of calm or knowing or of inner strength.

Buddhists have prayer wheels. The wheel is engraved with a prayer and every time the wheel is spun or turned the prayer is cast out to the world to do its good.

With all this praying going on around the world, where are the results?

Is praying worth the effort?

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